We are delighted to annouce the following special guest speakers to present their keynotes with the following titles, please check the programme page regularly for updates on the times, dates and locations.

 

 

Biography

Clive Simmonds

Electronic Systems, BAE Systems, Rochester, UK

 

Clive Simmonds has almost 30 years’ experience in the defence industry and is the Chief Engineer – Operations and BAE Systems, Rochester’ materials and processes guru in design for manufacture, assembly and test of complex electro mechanical and optical systems. Clive actively contributes to numerous respected industrial membership forums including ADS, TechUK, NPL, and BAE SYSTEMS adding to the UK and EU body of knowledge. Clive has lead collaborative reviews across a global supplier base for BAE Systems and has been both Manufacturing Director and the Manufacturing Engineering Manager responsible for ensuring Rochester products meet schedule, cost and quality requirements. A Lean Six Sigma Black Belt he is now focusing on the company's drive for Operational Excellence and Zero Defects.

Title:

Manufacturing Research: An Aerospace Perspective

Abstract:

Looking at the manufacturing of Electronic Systems as a key enabler to advances in Aerospace Technology.  This keynote speech will examine where we are, where we would like to be and what we are doing to get there. Following a brief overview of the global aerospace market and BAE Systems position in it, the importance of BAE Systems at Rochester, Kent, UK and its product and process capabilities will be outlined.  It will examine the importance of Product Lifecycle Management, Design for Manufacture, Knowledge Management, additive manufacturing, robotics and automated inspection and test in the context what goes on and will be going on at Rochester.

Download Simmonds' Full Presentation here

 

 

Biography

Brian Rutter

Ford Motor Company, Technical Development Centre, Essex

 

Brian is a Fellow of the Chartered Quality Institute and is the Systems Interface Engineering Manager at the Technical Development Centre of Ford Motor Company (Basildon). His roles include: European Lead developing and launching an innovation process; Currently developing a sustainable innovation process and associated training; Systems Engineering technology integration specifically focussing on interfaces between all engineering systems; Lead in developing training, delivering projects using systems engineering processes; Quality process lead in all aspects of quality tool and process deployment; and Professional career and personnel development mentor. Brian Has worked for Ford for 37 years during which time he has undertaken multiple assignments initially designing/calibrating engines and then engine and vehicle manufacturing. This experience lead various teams of engineers resolving quality issues in all aspects of product design and manufacturing. Recently he is the global corporate lead for system engineering processes. The critical aspect of this process focused on managing interfaces between engineering systems. It has also provided the analytical platform to integrate the growing number of technologies that are and will be introduced into vehicles in the future. The success of the systems engineering approach has further developed into a lead role to integrate innovation into a systems engineering design process. This process has global support.

Title:

Opportunity and Innovation

Abstract:

In this fast moving world in which we now reside, customer expectations are becoming more demanding encouraged by social and media narratives, particularly from the world of Internet of Things (IoT). There is increasing pressure to integrate technology, however, if technology is considered as the driving force it is possible that great opportunities can be missed or lost. The important part of the integration process is to reconcile technology requirements with existing or new architectures by chunking up opportunities that each technology enables, reconciling at a system level customer driven product attributes and cascading the resultant requirements down through the design to the lowest levels of design. One of the important consequences of such consideration in the intrinsic role opportunity discovery and innovation plays, not only to understand and resolve specific engineering opportunities but also to develop further opportunities at each technology interface node through to the total system. This presentation will explore the nature of opportunity generation and the subsequent innovation process.


 

Biography

Alain Bernard

Ecole Centrale de Nantes, France

 

Professor Bernard graduated in 1982, PhD in 1989, was associate-Professor, from 1990 to 1996 in Centrale Paris. From September 1996 to October 2001, he was Professor in CRAN, Nancy I, in the “Integrated Design and Manufacturing” team. Since 0ctober 2001, he has been Professor at Centrale Nantes and Dean for Research from 2007 to 2012. He is researcher in LS2N laboratory (UMR CNRS 6004) and the head of the “Systems Engineering – Products-Processes-Performances” team. His research topics are KM, PLM, information system modeling, interoperability, enterprise modeling, systems performance assessment, virtual engineering, and additive manufacturing.  He supervised more than 30 PhD students. He published more than 150 papers in refereed international journals and books. He is vice-President of AFPR (French Association on Rapid prototyping and Additive Manufacturing), vice-chairman of WG5.1 of IFIP (Global Product Development for the whole lifecycle) and member of CIRP Council (The International Academy for Production Engineering).

Title

Additive Manufacturing as a Key Factor for Smart Manufacturing

Abstract:

Smart Manufacturing systems need adaptive, flexible and reactive manufacturing technologies that allow producing customised products or tools for small batch production. Because of the large set of technologies available on the market and based on more than 30 years of practice, Additive Manufacturing is providing such variability in numbers, in variety, in shapes, in materials, that could answer quite often to one-of-a-kind production or small batches. This includes spare parts and also tools for more conventional processes such as injection moulding or casting. This keynote will show how additive manufacturing is a key factor for value creation in the context of a complete value chain, giving adaptive means for smart manufacturing systems.

Download Bernard's Full Presentation here

 

 

Biography

Benoit Eynard

Universite de Technologie de Compiegne, France

 

Professor Benoît Eynard is Director of the Institute for Mechatronics at the Université de Technologie de Compiègne – UTC, France. He is also a member of the UMR CNRS/UTC 7337 Roberval and responsible of the research team on Industrial Engineering. In 2007, he joined UTC as a Full Professor leading the Department of Mechanical Systems Engineering until 2012. From 2012 to 2013, he was Director for Partnership and Innovation of UTC. Previously, he was Assistant Professor at the Université de Technologie de Troyes where he managed the MSc program on Information Technology for Mechanical Engineering. Since 2013, he is general chairman of the academic group of French Society of Mechanical Engineering (AFM) dealing with Factories of the Future: integrated design and advanced manufacturing also known as AIP-PRIMECA network. He is also a member of the IFIP Working Group 5.1. entitled “Global Product development for the whole life-cycle” and of the Design Society where he currently leads the special interest group on “Design Methods for Cyber-Physical Systems”. In 1999, he obtained a PhD on Computer-Integrated Manufacturing from the University of Bordeaux. Now, he is a recognised researcher in product lifecycle management, collaborative design, systems engineering, mechatronic design, digital factory, manufacturing process management, eco-design and sustainable manufacturing. He has published over 60 papers of international journals and 160 international conferences. He also has been guest editor for 15 journal special issues and academic books.

Title

Product Lifecycle Management: Current Research Status and Latest Application Issues

Abstract:

The presentation will introduce a research review of the current trend and status in Product Lifecycle Management approach. First, it will summarise the application of PLM principles in beginning of life phase (product development, production engineering, manufacturing), middle of life phase (product shipping, operating and maintenance), and end of life phase (product retirement, reverse logistics, dismantling and recycling). Second, the new topics of research will be developed such as PLM for Mechatronic Systems and CPS, or PPS Lifecycle Management. Last, applications of PLM concepts in new context will be discussed such as for data and information management in Factories of the Future and Industrie 4.0; Architecture, Engineering and Construction (BIM) or Bio-Medical and Life Sciences

 

 

Biography

Peihua Gu

Office of the President, Shantou University, China

 

Professor Peihua Gu is currently Provost and Vice-President (Academic), Acting Dean of Engineering, Shantou University, China. Prior to coming to Shantou University in 2005, Dr. Gu was Head of the Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering (1999-2005) and NSERC Chair Professor, the University of Calgary, Canada. He is Fellow of Canadian Academy of Engineering and International Academy for Production Engineering – CIRP. His main research interests are in the areas of Adaptable Design and Intelligent Manufacturing. He is an author and co-author of over 200 technical publications. Dr. Gu has been an invited keynote or plenary speaker for a number of international and national conferences and a recipient of various awards and recognitions.

Title

Adaptable Design of Open Architecture Products

Abstract:

Adaptable design aims to enhance product life cycle competitiveness by providing adaptability of design and product for better quality and functionalities, more customised features, lower cost, quicker to respond to market needs, and more environment friendliness. The method consists of core elements of rationalised functional structure, adaptable architecture, adaptable interface and enhanced adaptabilities. Open-architecture products on other hand allow greater customers involvement in design process for product personalisation. An open architecture product normally consists of mass production modules, customised modules and personalised modules with specially designed interfaces. The design method has been developed as a cyber enabled tool for the adaptable design of open architecture products to facilitate customers and vendors’ participation in the process of the product development process through open, adaptable and standard interfaces. An industrial example will be provided to illustrate the method and the tools.

Download Gu's Full Presentation here

 

 

Biography

Yingguang Li

Nanjing University of Aeronotics and Astronautics, China

 

Prof Li’s research mainly focuses on high-efficient and energy-saving curing process of aircraft structural parts of composite materials, and intelligent numerical machining based on dynamic machining features. He published over 100 academic papers at international journals and conferences, and edited several special Issues of international journals. He owns 55 patents and copyright of more than 10 software systems. Prof Li directed more than 10 major projects funded by National Natural Science Foundation of China and China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation, General project of National Natural Science Foundation of China, and the National Science and Technology Major Project of China. He obtained the First Prize of China Machinery Industry Science and Technology Awards (2015), and the Second Prize of China State Technological Invention Awards (2016). Prof Li is the Associate Editor of IMechE Proceedings, Part B: Journal of Engineering Manufacture, and the Editorial Board Member of several international journals. He was invited to give Keynote Speeches at various international conferences in China, UK and Germany.

Title

High Efficient Energy Saving Curing Technology and Equipment for Advanced Aviation Composites

Abstract:

Fibre reinforced polymer composites (FRPs) with outstanding mechanical properties are increasingly used in aerospace products. Currently around 98% aeronautical composites are fabricated using autoclave curing technologies, where the material is placed in a closed tank and heated by the inside circulating airflow. The technology has a number of problems in manufacturing. For example, the deformation of composites of large size with varying thickness, due to large temperature gradients. Other problems are long process cycles and high energy consumption. This presentation will introduce the new high-pressure microwave curing technologies developed for processing composites with high quality requirement, short time and low cost. The characteristics of the traditional autoclave technologies, and the microwave curing technologies used in this research will be analysed. The microwave curing mechanism and mechanical performance of FRPs during the experiments will be presented. The high-pressure microwave curing equipment designed by the research team will be also introduced. Since the uniform heating of composites is crucial during microwave curing, a multi-pattern compensation method was proposed. And a real-time monitoring and control system has also been developed to ensure the quality of composite during microwave curing process.

 

 

Biography

Paul Maropoulos

Aston University, Birmingham, UK

 

Professor Paul Maropoulos is Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Research and Knowledge Exchange, at Aston University, where he is also the Professor of Manufacturing Engineering. Professor Maropoulos completed his postgraduate studies at UMIST, UK and prior to joining Aston University has held Professorial appointments at Durham University and the University of Bath. He is a Chartered Engineer, and has a strong influence in the engineering profession as a Fellow and Chairman of the Manufacturing Industries Division of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers. He maintains an international research presence as an elected Fellow of the International Academy of Production Engineering (CIRP) and Editor of the Journal of Engineering Manufacture, Part B of the Proceedings of the IMechE. Apart from research with blue chip companies, like Rolls-Royce, Airbus and Renishaw, Professor Maropoulos is interested in technology transfer working with SMEs, as well as strategic initiatives to enhance business productivity and manufacturing competitiveness.

Title

Digitization and Automation – Manufacturing Perspectives and Future Developments

Abstract:

This Lecture will review the global trends in digitisation of the various sectors of the economy and analyse its economic significance. The rapid development of new generation automation that is underpinned by artificial intelligence and enhanced communication and data handling capabilities offer new opportunities for changing the nature of doing business across various sectors. This will have considerable impact on the factory of the future. A review of historical development of manufacturing automation will be followed by examining key global manufacturing technologies and initiatives. In order to fully benefit from these technologies, we will need to drastically reconsider the way we design products and processes and new modelling and visualisation methods and systems are needed for the digital verification and validation of complex systems. Together with benefits, automation and digitization will introduce challenges and the socioeconomic perspectives of ever increasing automation are reviewed and areas for future, cross-sectoral research and policy development are identified.

 

 

Biography

Rajkumar Roy

School of Aerospace, Cranfield, UK

 

Professor Rajkumar Roy is the Professor of Competitive Design and the Director of Manufacturing. He is also the Directors of the Through-life Engineering Services Centre and Operations Excellence Institute at Cranfield University. He has over 22 years of academic and industrial experience in manufacturing research and education. His research interest includes through-life engineering services, cost engineering, product-service systems, design optimisation and applied soft computing and has published research papers in over 185 conferences and journals. His research sponsors include BAE Systems, Rolls-Royce, UK MoD, Tata Steel Europe, Airbus, GE Aviation, Lockheed Martin, BOC Edwards, Nissan, Bentley Motor Company and Ford Motor Company. He is a Chartered Engineer and a Fellow of the International Academy for Production Engineers (CIRP), Institution of Engineering Designers (IED), Association of Cost Engineers (ACostE), The Chartered Institute for Logistics and Transport (CILT). Currently Professor Roy is serving on the IET Manufacturing Policy Panel and the Manufacturing Advisory Board of Aerospace Technology Institute (ATI). He is the founder of the annual National Manufacturing Debate at Cranfield and The Manufacturing Co-operative.

Title

Engineering for Life: Current Research Challenges and the Future

Abstract:

Engineering for life is necessary for high value manufacturing and long life complex engineering systems. The keynote will argue a case for engineering for life and present an initial framework to scope the engineering approach. Professor Roy will outline examples of engineering for life and what it means for different stakeholders. Then the keynote will focus on current research directions in terms of foundations and technologies. Role of better understanding of novel materials, component and system through-life performance will be emphasised. Industrial sustainability through manufacturing is an essential of engineering for life. Impact of cutting edge technology to extend life of systems will be discussed with examples. Adapting with the changes across the life of a complex engineering system and achieve expected performance will require new capabilities. The Professor Roy will give specific examples of fundamental knowledge and technologies required for through-life engineering services. The keynote will identify future challenges and new research questions. Cyber-secure engineering systems and processes will be essential to support the complex engineering systems through-life.

Download Roy's Full Presentation here

 

 

Biography

Ashutosh Tiwari

Department of Automatic Contol & Systems Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK

 

Professor Ashutosh Tiwari is Airbus Chair in Advanced Manufacturing at the University of Sheffield.  Previously, he was Professor of Manufacturing Informatics and Head of Manufacturing Informatics Centre at Cranfield University. He is a fellow of the IMechE, a fellow of the IET, a member of the EPSRC Peer Review College and a fellow of the Higher Education Academy. His research focuses on two novel research themes: (i) Digitisation of skill-intensive manufacturing processes, such as wing manufacture and engine assembly, and (ii) Real-time simulation and multi-level optimisation of manufacturing processes. Prof Tiwari has developed a strong research track record by leading (as principal investigator) 8 EPSRC projects, 4 Innovate UK projects, an AMSCI project, 3 projects funded by the EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing, 5 Knowledge Transfer Partnership (KTP) projects and a Low Carbon KEEP project. He currently holds an EPSRC High Value Manufacturing Catapult Fellowship and is a co-investigator of the EPSRC Platform Grant on Through-life Performance. He has successfully completed the supervision of 26 PhD/EngD theses, 15 MSc by Research and MPhil theses, and 89 MSc theses. He has produced 287 research publications including 125 refereed journal papers and 112 refereed conference papers. He was awarded the IMechE Thatcher Bros Prize 2008/09 for the best journal paper in manufacturing, and the Best Paper Awards at SDM-2015 and DET-2014.

Title

Digitisation of Skill-Intensive Manufacturing Processes

Abstract:

This talk will focus on the development and application of novel digitisation techniques for smart industrial systems. The research on digitisation of skill-intensive manufacturing processes is based on the concept that every manual manufacturing task is an interaction between the human worker and the workpiece(s). In this interaction, every human action step on the workpiece is followed by feedback from the workpiece to which the worker reacts in the next step. This feedback could be visual, audible and/or tactile. A series of such action-feedback-reaction loops results in the workpiece being processed from start to finish. By observing these interactions and capturing human actions and their effects on the workpiece over the duration of the task and for multiple runs of that task, expert human gestures in executing the task and adept human responses to unexpected problems in the task, can be extracted and digitised. Now the availability of human motion data and the ability to acquire the depth perception to track changes to the workpiece (size, orientation, features) simultaneously makes it possible to capture human-workpiece interactions on a shopfloor in an inexpensive manner.

The simultaneous tracking of human actions and the effect of those actions on the workpiece(s) during a skill-intensive manual task and the digitisation of this real-time knowledge will be demonstrated in this talk using a gaming interface technology Microsoft KinectTM. The main steps in this research are the spatio-temporal segmentation of the captured continuous digital data into human and workpiece states and the subsequent human-workpiece state interaction modelling. These steps enable deeper investigation of manual tasks, decoding of associated human skills and eventually the prediction of human actions in response to given task scenarios, paving the way for intelligent automation of skill-intensive manual manufacturing tasks. As an example of this research, an Innovate UK project with Jaguar Land Rover and Holovis International developed a platform for geographically distributed manufacturing sites to collaborate in real-time. Another example is collaboration with GE and Lanner Group on an EPSRC project that has digitised real-life manufacturing processes for live feedback to manufacturing simulations.

In the near term, digitised knowledge of human postures and actions during manual manufacturing operations can be studied to assess the ergonomics and productivity of such operations and to redesign workstations. In the medium term, skills acquired and digitised from experienced craftsmen can be effectively transferred to apprentices via skill demonstrations in virtual workstations, minimising the need for long apprenticeships. In the long term, human skill models generated by capturing and modelling human-workpiece interactions from complex manufacturing tasks could provide the intelligence behind successful automation of such tasks